Georgina Maxwell is an eco-artist  responding to the lives and extinction of ocean  inhabitants in their struggle for survival in a desensitized, plastic-addicted world.

Being a protector of the oceans  eco-system is paramount to her work. These beautiful, intelligent, sentient beings are our relatives.  She feels a deep interconnectedness.

Maxwell's contemporary art merges eco-centric ethics, Buddhist philosophy, Green Theory, emotional intelligence and  scientific research This is within a conceptual, political, social and moral framework of site-specific, installation, performance, art-activism and framed  works.

She explores the therapeutic value of  imagining while walking and collecting. Investigating,

transforming and feeling impossible layered memories,  through making discarded plastic objects into  contemporary art.

Her practice as an eco-artist has stretched over twenty years.

Biography

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine Art based Textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo Sketchbook Prize.

As a studio and home Maxwell decided to buy a bus, living in various sites around London creating outdoor sculptures and ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox road kills became significant as ritualistic performances and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife in their stuggle for surival.

Maxwell's travels led her to Greece, amongst many other countires, where she witnessed an ancient, injured leatherback turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make tutle soup. Later this became a large painting using the markings from the turtles shell...once agian, in rememberance, of it's life and sad demise

In August 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse at Chun Quoit where she decided to settle on Gwithian dunes with her dog, near a three mile stretch of sandy beach . This is where she first discovered ocean plastics as her new art medium. For the past 20 years she has persued her career using marine plastics to raise awareness. From Cornish shorelines  toCalifornia, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and more recently the Arctic

She completed a two year Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University and headhunted by former director, Brian Stewart, to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from her MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection, rubbing shoulders with Monet, Manet, Moore, Miro and Magritte.

David Attenborough has recently acquired one of Maxwell's artworks. She has featured on a BBC2  art programme with Roy Bolton, a former Christie's advisor, who valued her artwork that she was showing at £15,000. Later he visited her other London exhibitions stating that the whole collection needs to reach the same values. Maxwell has shown four works alongside Grayson Perry's tapestry in Wreck and Ruin in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at Tate Britain. As well as being featured in numerous publicaations and continues to exhibit  internationally.

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine art based textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo sketchbook prize. As a studio and home she bought a converted bus, living in various sites while in London Creating outdoor sculptures, ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox roadkills were also significant as a ritualistic performance artist and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife.

 

Her travels led her to Greece (amongst other countries) where Maxwell witnessed an ancient, injured sea turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make turtle soup. I later made a large painting using the markings that had been on it's shell, in rememberence, once again, of it's life and sad demise.

 

In 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse in August when she decide to settle in Gwithian near a three mile stretch of sandy beach. For the past 20 years she has created artworks from ocean plastics sourced around the Cornish shorelines and subsequently from coastlines in California, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and most recently the Arctic.

 

She completed a two tear Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University. While being headhunted by former director Brian Stewart to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from my MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection. Rubbing shoulders with the Monet's, Manet's, Moore, Miro and Magritte's.

 

David Attenborough has acquired one of her artworks and has featured on BBC2 with Roy Bolton a former Christie's auctioneer, who valued her art work at £15,000. She has also shown many works along side Grayson Perry's tapestries in Wreck and Ruin exhibition in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at the Tate Britain in the 1970's. She has been featured in numerous publications that are on her website and exhibited widely.

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine art based textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo sketchbook prize. As a studio and home she bought a converted bus, living in various sites while in London Creating outdoor sculptures, ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox roadkills were also significant as a ritualistic performance artist and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife.

 

Her travels led her to Greece (amongst other countries) where Maxwell witnessed an ancient, injured sea turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make turtle soup. I later made a large painting using the markings that had been on it's shell, in rememberence, once again, of it's life and sad demise.

 

In 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse in August when she decide to settle in Gwithian near a three mile stretch of sandy beach. For the past 20 years she has created artworks from ocean plastics sourced around the Cornish shorelines and subsequently from coastlines in California, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and most recently the Arctic.

 

She completed a two tear Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University. While being headhunted by former director Brian Stewart to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from my MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection. Rubbing shoulders with the Monet's, Manet's, Moore, Miro and Magritte's.

 

David Attenborough has acquired one of her artworks and has featured on BBC2 with Roy Bolton a former Christie's auctioneer, who valued her art work at £15,000. She has also shown many works along side Grayson Perry's tapestries in Wreck and Ruin exhibition in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at the Tate Britain in the 1970's. She has been featured in numerous publications that are on her website and exhibited widely.

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine art based textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo sketchbook prize. As a studio and home she bought a converted bus, living in various sites while in London Creating outdoor sculptures, ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox roadkills were also significant as a ritualistic performance artist and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife.

 

Her travels led her to Greece (amongst other countries) where Maxwell witnessed an ancient, injured sea turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make turtle soup. I later made a large painting using the markings that had been on it's shell, in rememberence, once again, of it's life and sad demise.

 

In 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse in August when she decide to settle in Gwithian near a three mile stretch of sandy beach. For the past 20 years she has created artworks from ocean plastics sourced around the Cornish shorelines and subsequently from coastlines in California, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and most recently the Arctic.

 

She completed a two tear Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University. While being headhunted by former director Brian Stewart to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from my MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection. Rubbing shoulders with the Monet's, Manet's, Moore, Miro and Magritte's.

 

David Attenborough has acquired one of her artworks and has featured on BBC2 with Roy Bolton a former Christie's auctioneer, who valued her art work at £15,000. She has also shown many works along side Grayson Perry's tapestries in Wreck and Ruin exhibition in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at the Tate Britain in the 1970's. She has been featured in numerous publications that are on her website and exhibited widely.

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine art based textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo sketchbook prize. As a studio and home she bought a converted bus, living in various sites while in London Creating outdoor sculptures, ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox roadkills were also significant as a ritualistic performance artist and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife.

 

Her travels led her to Greece (amongst other countries) where Maxwell witnessed an ancient, injured sea turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make turtle soup. I later made a large painting using the markings that had been on it's shell, in rememberence, once again, of it's life and sad demise.

 

In 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse in August when she decide to settle in Gwithian near a three mile stretch of sandy beach. For the past 20 years she has created artworks from ocean plastics sourced around the Cornish shorelines and subsequently from coastlines in California, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and most recently the Arctic.

 

She completed a two tear Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University. While being headhunted by former director Brian Stewart to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from my MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection. Rubbing shoulders with the Monet's, Manet's, Moore, Miro and Magritte's.

 

David Attenborough has acquired one of her artworks and has featured on BBC2 with Roy Bolton a former Christie's auctioneer, who valued her art work at £15,000. She has also shown many works along side Grayson Perry's tapestries in Wreck and Ruin exhibition in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at the Tate Britain in the 1970's. She has been featured in numerous publications that are on her website and exhibited widely.

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine art based textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo sketchbook prize. As a studio and home she bought a converted bus, living in various sites while in London Creating outdoor sculptures, ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox roadkills were also significant as a ritualistic performance artist and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife.

 

Her travels led her to Greece (amongst other countries) where Maxwell witnessed an ancient, injured sea turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make turtle soup. I later made a large painting using the markings that had been on it's shell, in rememberence, once again, of it's life and sad demise.

 

In 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse in August when she decide to settle in Gwithian near a three mile stretch of sandy beach. For the past 20 years she has created artworks from ocean plastics sourced around the Cornish shorelines and subsequently from coastlines in California, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and most recently the Arctic.

 

She completed a two tear Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University. While being headhunted by former director Brian Stewart to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from my MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection. Rubbing shoulders with the Monet's, Manet's, Moore, Miro and Magritte's.

 

David Attenborough has acquired one of her artworks and has featured on BBC2 with Roy Bolton a former Christie's auctioneer, who valued her art work at £15,000. She has also shown many works along side Grayson Perry's tapestries in Wreck and Ruin exhibition in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at the Tate Britain in the 1970's. She has been featured in numerous publications that are on her website and exhibited widely.

Georgina Maxwell completed a BA in Fine art based textiles at Central St Martin's College of Art London in 1989 where she was also awarded the Stabillo sketchbook prize. As a studio and home she bought a converted bus, living in various sites while in London Creating outdoor sculptures, ephemeral artworks from flytips and found natural objects. Fox roadkills were also significant as a ritualistic performance artist and an obsession for protecting and honoring wildlife.

 

Her travels led her to Greece (amongst other countries) where Maxwell witnessed an ancient, injured sea turtle on Lefkas island, that she photographed, horrified by a group of Greek men carrying it off to make turtle soup. I later made a large painting using the markings that had been on it's shell, in rememberence, once again, of it's life and sad demise.

 

In 1999 Maxwell moved from London to Cornwall to watch the total solar eclipse in August when she decide to settle in Gwithian near a three mile stretch of sandy beach. For the past 20 years she has created artworks from ocean plastics sourced around the Cornish shorelines and subsequently from coastlines in California, Canada, Morocco, S. France, La Rochelle and most recently the Arctic.

 

She completed a two tear Masters degree in Fine Art: Contemporary Practice at Falmouth University. While being headhunted by former director Brian Stewart to exhibit at the Darwin 200: Voyages of Discovery exhibition at the Award winning Falmouth Art Gallery, with an installation from my MA Show and a wall-based artwork which became part of their permanent collection. Rubbing shoulders with the Monet's, Manet's, Moore, Miro and Magritte's.

 

David Attenborough has acquired one of her artworks and has featured on BBC2 with Roy Bolton a former Christie's auctioneer, who valued her art work at £15,000. She has also shown many works along side Grayson Perry's tapestries in Wreck and Ruin exhibition in 2017. She has sold works, amongst others, to video artists who exhibited at the Tate Britain in the 1970's. She has been featured in numerous publications that are on her website and exhibited widely.